ASMR artist to talk about surviving narcissistic abuse and the benefits of ASMR at Sept 28 2019 conference in the UK

Snetha Badhan is a British Indian living in the United Kingdom, a  certified Person-Centred Counsellor, and the ASMR artist known as CoconutsWhisper on YouTube.

Snetha is also a survivor of Honour Based Violence, Forced Marriages, Gender Abuse, Discrimination, Immigration Fraud and an Admin in the Surviving the Narcissistic Ex Partner Closed Group UK /Worldwide on Facebook.

On September 28, 2019 she will speak  at the conference, “SURVIVE AND THRIVE AFTER NARCISSISTIC ABUSE”  which can be attended live at Manchester, UK or via an online webinar.  Here is a summary of the event:

“A day of key industry expert speakers on who will advise on how to overcome and combat abuse, how a Narcissists mind works and recovery and survival techniques. There will also be real survivors talking about their recovery and how they have managed to overcome and walk away from the ex Narcissist. You will have the opportunity to take part in a question and answer session, talk to other victims and to meet other like minded women who have gone through the same traumatic experiences as yourself!”

In my interview with Snetha she shares how narcissism has impacted her life, how ASMR has helped her, and important information about narcissistic abuse and the upcoming conference.

Below are my questions in bold, Snetha’s replies in italics, and links to learn more about   the upcoming conference.

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Is ASMR whispering bad for your throat or vocal cords?

The ASMR artist, Deni ASMRCZ, recently asked me if whispering is bad for the throat or vocal cords.

A 2006 research article stated, “For years, otolaryngologists and voice therapists have warned voice patients that whispering causes more trauma to the larynx than normal speech. However, no large series of patients has ever been examined fiberoptically during whispering to test this hypothesis.

In 2011, The New York Times asked Dr. Robert T. Sataloff, chairman of the otolaryngology department at Drexel University College of Medicine why clinicians recommend that patients avoid whispering.  He said this recommendation was based on “years of pronouncement and almost no research, like so much in medicine.”

Even when searching for more recent research publications, there doesn’t seem to be any research studies which clearly answer this question yet, but there are personal experiences, clinical opinions, and physiological studies.

I’ll cover all three of these types of sources.

Let’s begin in 2009 with the first ASMR artist, WhisperingLife.  She mentioned in some of her videos that whispering sometimes hurt her voice.  This may have been one of the reasons her videos were relatively short and averaged about 10 minutes long.

Jump forward to 2019.  I’ve created over 200 podcast episodes for the Sleep Whispers podcast of pure whispering, with an average length of 40 minutes each and a max length of 90 minutes.  I’ve never felt any discomfort in my throat or voice, but I do often feel like I am running out of breath.

So these two simple and personal examples highlight that whispering may create different types of discomfort for different individuals.

Let’s see what further evidence I can uncover for the effect of whispering on the throat and vocals.

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Interview with Zarbondb, one of the first ASMR artists on YouTube

Tony (full name withheld) is currently an IT technician at a multinational company in Spain.

In 2009 though, Tony was finishing his studies in Spain, working as a Service Desk employee, and also creating whisper videos as “Zarbondb”.

He was one of the first ASMR artists, perhaps the third one, and was referred to as a “whisper artist” or “whisperer” because the term “ASMR” hadn’t been coined and widely used yet.

In my interview with Tony he shares how he discovered whisper videos, why he started his channel, his memories of the whisper community, and why he chose the name “Zarbondb”.

Below are my questions in bold, his replies in italics, a link to his whisper videos, and a link to his Twitch channel of retro gaming.

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Interview with Mysterious_Goo, one of the first ASMR artists on YouTube

Jenny (full name withheld) is currently a drama teacher in London, England.

In 2009 though, Jenny was a Theatre studies student in London who was also creating whisper videos as “Mysterious_Goo”.

She was one of the first ASMR artists, perhaps the second one, and was referred to as a “whisper artist” or “whisperer” because the term “ASMR” hadn’t been coined and widely used yet.

In my interview with Jenny she shares how she discovered whisper videos, why she started her channel, her memories of the whisper community, and why she chose the name “Mysterious_Goo”.

Below are my questions in bold and her replies in italics.

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Interview with CrisperWhisper, one of the early ASMR artists on YouTube

Andrew (full name withheld) is currently a Senior Software Engineer working for a fortune 200 company in Colorado, US.

In 2009 though, Andrew was a college student studying computer networking and also creating whisper videos as “CrisperWhisper”.

He was one of the early ASMR artists who were commonly called “whisper artists” or “whisperers” because these individuals were creating whisper videos before the term “ASMR” was coined and widely used.

In my interview with Andrew he shares how he discovered whisper videos, why he started his channel, vivid memories of the whisper community, and one of his biggest regrets.

Below are my questions in bold, his replies in italics, and a link to his new ASMR channel.

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Filmmaker completes production of the ASMR-inspired movie, “3AMASMR”

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityIn 2016, I posted an article that began, “Filmmaker begins production of the ASMR-inspired movie.

Good news.  The movie is done and available for all to view.

The movie was created by Mike Reed who lives in Denmead, UK.   Mike also creates ASMR videos for his YouTube channel, “ASMR Show

The working title of his movie was, “P.A.I.N.” and is now released as “3AMASMR” or you can think of the title as “3 am ASMR.”

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Student journalist writes an insider profile of the journey and perspectives of the ASMR artist, theASMRnerd.

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityWill Koziey-Kronas is an undergraduate student majoring in Professional Writing at the University of Toronto in Canada.

For his course, Introduction to Journalistic Investigations, he was assigned to write a profile piece.

He chose to profile ASMR through the experiences of an ASMR artist.  Will explains why,

“People who aren’t familiar with ASMR are usually fascinated by it when their introduced for the first time.  I figured a piece about an ASMR creator, written as an introduction to ASMR, would be very compelling.”

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More celebrities doing ASMR: Jake Gyllenhaal, Dakota Fanning, Elle Fanning, Julia Garner, Chloë Sevigny, Sadie Sink

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityJake Gyllenhaal (actor in Brokeback Mountain, Donnie Darko, Nightcrawler) does a short interview with W Magazine which includes ASMR triggers.

He whispers about his day, plays with an old style camera, and twists bubble wrap.  He also bangs a chisel into wood with a rubber mallet, which may not be so ASMR-inducing for many individuals.

On the YouTube channel, Miu Miu, several actors join forces to create individual and collaborative ASMR videos.  The clips are less than a minute long and mostly involve whispering or quiet talking.

The Miu Miu team includes Sadie Sink (Stranger Things 2, Annie), Dakota Fanning (I am Sam, War of the Worlds, Charlotte’s Web), Elle Fanning (We Bought a Zoo, Maleficent), Julia Garner (Ozark, The Americans, We Are What We Are), and Chloë Sevigny (American Psycho, Big Love, American Horror Story).

Click the links below to view their ASMR videos:

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Interview with ASMR Muzz, a video artist delivering Scottish tingles

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityMurray is an actor and IT technologist with a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Media Technology. He currently lives in Nova Scotia, Canada with prior residence in New Zealand and Scotland.

Murray also resides on YouTube as ASMR Muzz, posting relaxing Scottish-accented videos and tranquil ASMR trigger sounds.

In my interview with Murray he shares memories of ASMR from his youth, his inspiration for creating ASMR videos, his most popular video, his challenges creating content, his tips for new ASMR artists, and how his videos may be helping others.

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