Science of ASMR: The third peer-reviewed research publication (podcast episode #12)

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian ResponseIn this podcast episode, I will be summarizing the third peer-reviewed research publication about ASMR and sharing an interview with the authors.

The paper is titled, ““An Examination of Personality Traits Associated with Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR)”)” and was published in the journal, Frontiers in Psychology on February 23, 2017. The authors are Beverley Fredborg, Jim Clark, and Stephen Smith from the University of Winnipeg in Manitoba, Canada.

This podcast episode will cover the following topics:

  • What are the personality traits associated with ASMR-sensitive individuals?
  • What are the most intense ASMR triggers?
  • How they recruited participants and determined ASMR sensitivity.
  • The focus of their next ASMR research publication.
  • and more.

Subscribe to the ASMR University Podcast to hear all of the past and future episodes or listen to this one episode right here:

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Participate now in a research study about ASMR, flow, tingles, and relaxation.

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityAlfa Ramirez is pursuing her B.A. in Psychology with a minor in Digital Cinema Arts at Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missouri, USA.

She completed a prior ASMR research project which I wrote about here in December 2016.

Alfa has obtained IRB approval for another ASMR research study and you can participate in her study by clicking the link to her survey (link is below).

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ASMR data from website polls (February 2016 update)

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityThis article is an update about the data collected by the polls on this website polls which are located HERE.

This updated summary has website poll data from about 1,100 individuals (about twice the amount since the last update).

This data is specific to the population of visitors to this website who take these website polls and may not be applicable to other populations.

Below is a short summary of the data, followed by the full data from the polls.

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ASMR data from website polls (August 2015 update)

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityMy co-investigators and I are still collecting data for our on-going ASMR research survey.  That research survey has collected data from 13,000 individuals.  Information about that research survey is HERE.

This blog post is an update about the data collected by my website polls which are located on the “First Time Visitor” page.

My prior summary of the website poll data was when there were data from about 150 people.  You can read about that prior summary HERE.

This updated summary has website poll data from about 600 people.

This data is specific to the population of visitors to this website who take the website polls and may not be applicable to other populations.

Below is a short summary of the data, followed by the full data from the polls.

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Part 4: The first peer-reviewed publication about ASMR: Interview with the authors

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityThis is Part 4, and the conclusion, of my blog post series on the first peer-reviewed paper about ASMR.

As a refresher, the paper is titled, “Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state”. It was published on March 26th, 2015 in the journal PeerJ.

This post is an interview with the authors of the paper, Emma Barratt and Nick Davis.

Dr. Nick Davis has his PhD in Psychology from the University of Birmingham (UK) and is currently working in the Department of Psychology at Swansea University (UK) as a Lecturer in Psychology.

Ms Emma Barratt is the lead author of the paper and has her MSc in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University (Wales).

The authors share their inspirations for beginning the research, challenges with writing the paper, and Ms. Barratt finds out a shocking fact about her co-author.

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Part 3: The first peer-reviewed publication about ASMR: Meaning of the data & next steps.

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityThis is Part 3 of my blog post series on the first peer-reviewed paper about ASMR.

As a refresher, the paper is titled, “Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state”.  It was authored by Emma Barratt and Nick Davis and was published on March 26th, 2015 in the journal PeerJ.

This post is going to focus on the meaning of some of the data, as well as highlight how future studies could build on the helpful foundation provided by the authors of this paper.

This post is mostly for students and researchers looking for ASMR research ideas.  Just look for the sections in this post marked “Next steps” for potential ASMR research projects you could do.

Let’s begin by reviewing and understanding the methods and the participants, this will help to keep the overall meaning of the data in an appropriate scope.

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Part 2: The first peer-reviewed publication about ASMR: Significance of the paper

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityThis is Part 2 of my blog post series on the first peer-reviewed paper about ASMR.

As a refresher, the paper is titled, “Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state”.  It was authored by Emma Barratt and Nick Davis and was published on March 26th, 2015.

This post is going to focus on the significance of this first peer-reviewed research paper about ASMR.

Lets begin with asking: what does it mean when a paper is “peer-reviewed?”

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Part 1: The first peer-reviewed publication about ASMR: Summary of the data

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityThe first peer-reviewed paper about ASMR has been published in the journal PeerJ.

I am highly excited about this event and very proud of the authors of this paper.

The paper is titled, “Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state” and is authored by Emma Barratt and Nick Davis. The authors are members of the Department of Psychology at Swansea University in the United Kingdom.

The publication was officially published as a peer-reviewed publication on March 26, 2015, but was initially published as a “PrePrint” on December 18, 2014.

The study was reviewed and approved by the Swansea University Department of Psychology Ethics Committee prior to the initiation of data collection.

This is such an important achievement that I will cover this event in several blog posts. This first post will simply focus on summarizing the data in the publication.

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Research group at The University of Sheffield investigating the characteristics of ASMR

Giulia Poerio, Theresa Veltri, Emma Blakey, and Tom Hostler are graduate students in the Department of Psychology at The University of Sheffield in the U.K.

They have combined their expertise in psychology, physiology, and emotion to investigate the idiosyncratic characteristics of ASMR.

The research group shares their motivations and several unanticipated challenges and reactions that have occurred thus far with their project.

Below are my questions in bold, followed by their replies in italics.

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