Polls about ASMR

Scroll down to take some polls related to your thoughts and experiences about ASMR.

After you make your selection and click “Vote”, you will see all the data from prior visitors.

If you have already voted and just want to see the data then click “View Results”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

59 thoughts on “Polls about ASMR

  1. Pingback: The ultimate braingasm with tingling sensation: ASMR | Voice of London

  2. Since I was introduced to the concept of ASMR through one of Marias videos I’m starting to feel ASMR even in the normal everyday life, it’s like something was awoken in my head and now I get this sensation from things that didn’t affect me before.

    Like

  3. i can trigger this feelings,sensations whitout any external stimulation, i dont have to see hear o feel anything i just do it like when someone move a limb, it just does it, i can be see stuff or not, touching or not,hearing or not this has nothing to do whit the outside world for me,theres no external stimulation required. and i cant make it happend since i was a kid, i fact i having using like… forever, when i got hurt as a child for example playing soccer,cos i dont feel any phisical pain when im doing it. its a brainsnestetic no just a braingasm, im just found out this have a name!!!! im thrill!!

    Like

  4. Pingback: ASMRのアンケート調査に参加してみよう! | ASMR生活

  5. I can’t believe that I’m reading these comments from people that have experienced this. I’ve tried to explain this to many people and just stopped because not one understood what I was talking about. And now you’re saying that we can watch something that “suites”our triggers and experience it on demand? I’m in!!!!!!

    Like

  6. Pingback: ASMR data from website polls (February 2016 update) | ASMR University

  7. Pingback: *** Contribute to the Understanding of ASMR *** | ASMR University

  8. Pingback: Contribute to the Understanding of ASMR | ASMR University

  9. That is so interesting! I tend to associate ASMR with being a baby, and people holding you close and kissing and cooing to you. I always make a soft “pshhh pshhh” sound in babies’ ears. They love it!

    Like

  10. This may seem stupid but I had a reoccurring dream when young with a soft clicking or tutting sound and in a dark enclosed place.

    I believe I was remembering being in the womb

    Soft voices and hand movements do it and makes me want to stroke my face

    Liked by 1 person

    • Wow, I have always had these strange sorts of dreams too. Its mainly colours, splotches and watery sounds and blobs. I don’t know why but I have always associated it with being in the womb too. I have no idea how I even got this idea in my head but it has just always seems like thats what it was. So strange!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I’ve experienced this for as long as I can remember. I’m now 31, and just learning that this is an experience that other people have. In reading about this phenomenon, I think I have more triggers than the average person–sounds (gum chewing, crinkling, tapping, whispering, cooking), visual stimuli (especially watching calm, repetitive movements like folding clothes, knitting, tai chi), and physical stimuli (especially having my hair brushed or hands massaged) all trigger ASMR for me.

    I wonder though if this is related at all to misophonia, as I also experience this, though far less frequently. The commonest trigger for my misophonia is slurping and smacking food. This seems so odd to me considering similar sounds elicit the ASMR for me!

    If it’s of interest, I also have auditory/tactile synesthesia. Low frequency sounds elicit a sensation that I’m being touched on my back. These are not the same sounds that trigger ASMR for me, and my synesthetic experience is completely different (and I’d say far more mundane) than the ASMR experience. Synesthesia is just a normal part of my life that I don’t really notice much or care about, whereas ASMR is a pleasurable, relaxing experience that I find I seek out.

    I’m very interested to see where research ends up in the future, particularly if there are any overlapping neurological mechanisms for these different phenomena.

    Like

  12. I have experienced ASMR since I was little. My aunt would lightly drag her fingernails on my arm and it would put me in a trance (we called it “tickling” but she was barely touching me). In college, in the library, with all the whispering, pages turning, and odd lighting, I would get such tingles I couldn’t study! And it would often put me to sleep. I watch the videos and love slow crinkling and any kind of whispering. But nothing does it like real life. I stood next to someone in a store the other day; we were very close to each other, looking at opposite sides of the aisle and I got major tingles. Likewise, when my friend was pinning a dress hem for me. And if I’m on the phone with someone who is typing and quietly whispering to themselves–all huge triggers!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. in the polls i selected “between the ages of 13 and 18” for first experiencing it, even though it was likely before 13. i just didn’t start noticing it until i was a teenager.
    also, i feel like i’m one of the few people that didn’t learn about ASMR from youtube. i remember i was driving with my sister and thought i’d ask her something that i had been thinking about lots lately and risked sounding completely crazy, and said in a roundabout way “have you ever, like, had a pleasant feeling while watching something…” and she told me that she learned about ASMR from one of our friends studying psychology. i always figured either everyone experiences it, or i’m the only one and i’m weird.

    Like

  14. I find it interesting that the “brain tingle” seems to most readily discussed as a reaction to sound. I don’t recall ever having that sensation from sound, I get it from touch. It is not something I feel on my skin – there is a sound that makes my skin “crawl” that is not pleasant. For me I have a euphoric “brain tingle” from touch – specifically, it occurs consistently when I get a spa pedicure. Even more specifically, it occurs when having a salt scrub on my legs. It does not feel like a sexual experience, so it is not touch in that way. And I don’t feel a tingle on my legs – it is “in my head.” Thinking about it immediately to an hour or two afterwards sometimes triggers the response again in the head area or as a shooting tingle – but this is rare. It isn’t a sensation that I would describe as on my skin but in my body. I would LOVE to see read more cognitive studies on the subject.

    Like

  15. Since a young age, I’ve always felt a tingling sensation when my hair was being touched. I particularly (And still do!) loved haircuts, my mother and siblings grooming and styling my hair for me, and my older sister or mom occasionally giving me scalp massages. Throughout the years, I’ve gained more triggers such as personal attention, ‘presenting’ (Where someone shows you an item), hand grooming, people in good moods, and many more. I never knew the name of it until about two years ago, when I was watching VSauce, and then researched as to why I experienced this particular sensation, and my suspicions were correct–I experience asmr! Ever since, I’ve been watching asmr videos like I read books, and I’ve found myself addicted to the relaxing sensation. Mine in particular feels like a rushing, chilly wave blanketing over my head, and sometimes reaching to my arms.

    Like

  16. My first experience with ‘the whisperchills’ was at school, aged 13. My PE teacher took another class for us, religious education. I am a strong believer ALL religion should be abolished. She accepted my opinion, respected it and continued a mature conversation with us all. She spoke softly, with understanding. To her, we weren’t just kids. We were young adults.

    Like

  17. I am curious to know how many people who experience asmr also like to play video games, watch movies and tv shows or read books. Because i think there is a correlation between asmr and the need to “escape” into fantasy worlds created by video games or movies, tv shows and books.

    Like

    • That is a great question and unfortunately my current research survey does not gather direct data about that, and I don’t know of anyone else collecting data about that. But it is a good research curiosity. I agree with you that there may be a correlation bc I am seeing a trend in my data that some people just watch ASMR videos for enjoyment. Anything enjoyable can be a similar escape like movies, tv, or books. I would encourage you or anyone else to pursue this great question.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I definitely enjoy reading and television, but I’d imagine you’d have a difficult time finding a person who didn’t enjoy at least one of the activities you mention. I’m not sure it is related to ASMR so much as being human.

      Like

    • This is a really interesting thought and I can agree with Rhiowen’s comment that you would “have a difficult time finding a person who didn’t enjoy the activities you mentioned” but I’ll weigh in here, for the sake of research. I’m one of those difficult-to-find people. I don’t play and have never played video games or owned a videogame console, can rarely watch an entire movie or TV show, and can almost never make it through an entire book. I experience ASMR multiple times per week and have experienced it since childhood. I’m 25 now.
      If a fantasy can grab me, I am 100% committed to it and will escape into it mercilessly. However, I am inclined to pursue concrete details, facts, and realms of non-fiction 99% of the time.

      Like

  18. My strongest ASMR experience happens when I hear people talking softly in a foriegn language. In college I would plan to spend my lunch hour in a particular area of the library with foriegn language students. Sounds creepy, but I would be so relaxed I would often take a nap! Another time I was watching a PBS documentary about Amish women and their quilt making. The camera was positioned under a large loom, and the sound of the needles threading through the material did me in. I was thrilled to read an article in the Denver Post today about a local YouTube ASMR artist. Very excited to learn more about this wonderful phenomena.

    Like

  19. I’m a 25 year old female. My first memorable ASMR experience was Middle School. I would be waiting for class to start and I’d glance across the room and see girls braiding each other’s hair and I’d get intense tingles/”brain-gasm”s! The same thing happened at slumber parties. Hair-play has always been my #1 trigger. Now days I watch asmrmassage on You Tube and her videos help a lot with my Insomnia and Migraines. I came out about my ASMR to my husband a few months ago (I didn’t even know ASMR was a movement, he caught me listening to a soft spoken video one night and was totally confused). At first he said he could relate because he gets shivers through his body, like the online definition states. But like a previous commenter stated, “Chills” and “ASMR” are quite different. I get Chills a lot, but when I get ASMR I know it’s entirely different. After I explained to my husband that it literally feels like my brain is having an orgasm he said he definitely doesn’t have it – haha!

    Like

  20. My first experience of ASMR was at the age of 18, when my mom was filing and buffing her nails beside me. Suddenly and for no reason it made me extremely relaxed, and I just sat on the sofa staring at one spot, apparently unable to move a finger!
    I thought (as well as my mom!) that I was a freak, as the ASMR phenomenon was completely unknown back then.
    Since then, the list of my triggers has grown considerably.
    However, my friends and relatives continue to regard me as a freak :))

    Like

  21. Pingback: ASMR data from website polls (August 2015 update) | ASMR University

  22. I experience ASMR when ever I hear something soft like a whisper or tapping, I remember first experiencing it in the 2,3,or 4 grade, when ever some one would touch me lightly,And I have had it ever since.

    Like

  23. This is day 2 since I have become familiar with the term ASMR. I started to read into it and do some quick online research (aka Google) to learn more about it after finding myself on enjoying youtube videos these last 2 nights. I was curious why I found these type of videos so relaxing. For the last two nights its helped me go to sleep. However, I have always found myself extremely relaxed when someone is doing quiet things around me. I also laughed when I read on a link that a common trigger for those who experience ASMR is the “happy trees” painter from PBS. I literally laughed out loud because I often found myself watching his shows and not being able to change the channel. I secretly enjoyed it but I didn’t know why! I realized tonight that the earliest memory I have of this ASMR experience was when I was in 3rd or 4th grade when a girl I was sitting next to in school was eating hard candy during reading time. You’re not supposed to have candy in class so she was eating it as quiet as she could. I still remember this vividly because it relaxed me so much I secretly hoped she wouldn’t ever run out of candy. Something about the sound of her crunching and the crinkling of the wrappers. So weird but now I am finding I’m not alone and there are thousands if not millions out there experiencing this. I feel like I finally have a diagnosis and a name to something I’ve experienced my whole life. I’m thrilled to see research on this subject to say the least and am curious to see what comes of it in the future as more research is done.

    Like

  24. I’m 47 and I’ve also been experiencing ASMR as long as I can remember. My earliest memories are from my mom brushing my hair or when the girl behind me in school would braid my hair. It’s also been triggered with light (non-sexual) touch, sleepy whispering with a friend, parent, or partner, close and quiet proximity with a loved one–things like that. Every so often, it would be triggered by certain visuals or audio in films and tv shows. I only discovered this name for it this week when a Facebook conversation mentioned that a certain actress might appeal to people who have ASMR because of her voice. I had no idea what that meant, so I googled and it led me to this whole community and intentional ASMR videos. It’s a much needed and welcome discovery! I have had really high stress levels over the last few years. I’ve also not had a relationship of the kind that really provides that kind of intimate light touch or closeness in a long time (I do have friends, but the kind you go to dinner with and talk to–not cuddle up to). I had made a connection that the two things were related: I believed that I had more anxiety because I had no way to get that kind of comforting and calming feeling, but didn’t know what to do about it. Certain videos really do work for me and, in just a couple of day of “using” the videos, I already feel more calm and less anxious. Aside from the personal benefit, as an academic, I’m just finding this whole thing really fascinating and am interested to learn more.

    Like

  25. Well, I share a lot of the same experiences as other commenters here – but I guess I’m perhaps a bit weirder as the tingles can result in more than just a “head orgasm” (in fact, I don’t know what that is) . . . the tingles will build and result in an actual orgasm. I always thought that I was some kind of freak feeling the tingles without any direct touch, so I was blown away by the This American LIfe story. It’s good to know that I’m not alone.

    Like

  26. There have been several murmurs in the scientific community about the connection of ASMR, synesthesia, and misophonia. Obviously you all know what ASMR, but synesthesia and misophonia are relatively obscure. Synesthesia is a neurological phenomenon in which stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to automatic, involuntary experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway. In other words when people who have it see/smell/feel certain stimuli, their brain automatically connects it with a different stimuli. For instance apple cider feels like sandpaper in my mouth, and when I touch sandpaper I taste apple cider. Misophonia is a much more common disorder (a 4-out-of-5 compared to synesthesia’s mere 5%)in which a certain “trigger” sound causes a person to experience “flight of flight” symptoms, meaning they either have to escape the situation at all costs or the feel the need to hit the cause of the sound and scream at it. Common triggers include slurping, throat-clearing, nail-clipping, chewing, drinking, tooth-brushing, breathing, sniffing, talking, sneezing, yawning, walking, gum-chewing or popping, laughing, snoring, swallowing, gulping, typing, coughing, humming, whistling, singing, certain consonants, plate squeaking, or repetitive sounds. So I’d like to know if you guys think there is a connection and if you think you may have synesthesia and/or misophonia.

    Like

    • I wonder the same thing.

      I have auditory/tactile synesthesia. Low frequency sounds elicit the sensation of being touched (it’s not the same as feeling the vibrations of low sounds). It’s such a normal part of my life that I don’t really think about it or notice it though, anymore so than I notice that I can see colors rather than being color-blind. My synesthesia is due to a brain injury, but I’ve experienced ASMR for as long as I can remember. It’s also a completely different sensation, but I think it’s worth mentioning that sounds are huge triggers for ASMR for me, so it’s possible that my auditory nerves are a factor.

      I also experience misophonia, though it’s infrequent. It is not something I can ignore, and it often causes such an intense and sudden animosity toward the person (or object–a clicking ceiling fan sets my teeth on edge) causing it that I have to leave the vicinity. I sometimes feel the urge to copy the sounds they make, but it makes me feel a bit crazy, so I usually escape.

      Oddly enough, similar sounds can cause ASMR for me. I feel like these phenomena must be related in some way. I look forward to future research to see if there are overlapping neurological mechanisms behind these experiences.

      Like

  27. from what i can tell i only get ASMR from music. and only on certain music,

    i always thought everyone felt that with music (especially since people say good music can send shivers down your spine… i always figured that’s what they’re referring to)

    Like

  28. I have experienced ASMR for as long as I can remember, but I had no idea that it was a “thing” until last year. I only ever attempted to describe the sensation to a few people before that. I told them that certain things gave me the “warm fuzzies” (I had no idea how better to describe it). Before exploring ASMR specific videos, I mostly listened to videos of people playing idiophone-type percussion instruments such as Marimbas, Hang Drums, and Singing Bowls. I also like watching other people have their make-up done. I wish more ASMR videos contained the latter rather than someone pretending to do my makeup or doing their own. But, the ASMRtists have done a pretty good job, overall, creating something for everyone.

    Like

  29. So glad I found this site. Until yesterday I thought I was all alone in this experience because the few people I had mentioned it to in my lifetime (I’m 61) didn’t know what I was talking about and I have never heard of it mentioned by anyone else. My trigger comes when someone shows me an unexpected kindness, particularly if it is a stranger. An example would be when the doorbell rang and a youth from a local church handed me a small gift bag at Easter time. This site is wonderful! So happy to know that others experience this sensation also.

    Like

  30. I’m 19 and I’ve been experiencing ASMR my whole life. The videos do trigger me but it has always been stronger in real life, most strongly when someone is showing me how to do something or telling me do do a list of things in a relaxed soft, voice. My oldest ASMR memory is of a neighbor girl playing “doctor” (the innocent kind… not the kind of doctor you creeps are thinking of) on me. I was laying down and she was taping my knee lightly.

    Like

  31. I’ve never actually told anyone in person about my ASMR experience. Not because I’m ashamed of it, it’s never weird or sexual, but I just don’t think people who don’t have it have a frame to understand it. I first noticed it in preschool: my friend and I would play with blocks and brushes and pretend to put make-up on each other. She probably thought I was weird, because I always wanted it to be my turn! Ha. Then around 3rd-5th grade I would get it when teachers intensely read descriptive scenes (I remembered if I squeezed my eyes or tried to increase pressure in my head, it could intensify the experience). Then as an adolescent I would only notice it if I heard a teacher write on a chalkboard every now and then, and my hand would actually paralyze temporarily because the feelings were so intense, then it would fade away. Then I finally stumbled across ASMR as a 21 year old, and a large variety of videos do it for me! I kind of like mystical videos with like a witch casting a spell on me, or someone doing a reiki session (which is weird because I’m a woman of science and don’t really put any value in the supernatural). I like feeling like I’m part of this community. I’m in medical school and I’ve always wanted to ask professors about it, but I don’t know how well that would go.

    Like

  32. I’m 51 and I went my entire life without experiencing ASMR. I had never even heard about it. Then I learned Transcendental meditation and had these sensations while I meditated. After a while I started to feel these sensations even when I wasn’t meditating, especially when I was driving my car. Now I feel them almost all the time when I’m not moving around too much. I feel it to a low level right now! I just discovered the Youtube videos and I was surprised that they worked on me. I am so happy to have found this sight because I was extremely curious as to what was happening. No one else knew what I was talking about, including my TM instructor. It’s nice to feel that I’m not alone!

    Like

  33. I’ve always felt this and I never know that about anyone that could fell the same. Since I discovered this term ASMR I started to look for videos and information. I’m very interested in the biological ways that makes this amazing feeling possible.

    Like

  34. You know how sharks enter a state of paralysis of some sorts, when flipped over. Well, that is exactly how still I remain when I hear a soothing whispering voice. I’m almost 28 and it’s been happening to me ever since I can remember. What a joyful feeling!

    Like

  35. hello! i assume that when we speak about asmr we are referring to something distinguishable from the ‘chills’ feeling some people experience when listening to a familiar/enjoyable piece of music?

    Like

    • That’s correct, I experience both chills and ASMR. ASMR for me feels a lot like an orgasm experienced inside my head. It’s a very pleasurable and pleasant sensation.

      Chills on the other hand are experienced as a “wave” of goose bumps that pass through me upon hearing certain music, or seeing certain displays of talent.

      Hope this helped!

      ciao,

      Dommy

      Like

      • You explain the diffferences between the two very well! When I first told my husband I had ASMR he thought I was talking about chills and said he gets it to but I told him my ASMR is 95% all my brain/head and has a “orgasm” like feeling. After I told him that he said he definitely doesn’t have it – haha!

        Like

  36. Hello Fellow ASMR folks! My name is Keely and I am 29 years old, I remember my first experience with ASMR at the age of 5. It was late at night and I woke up to tingling sensations all over my body caused by the sound of the washer and dryer going at the same time. Ever since that day I noticed sounds and voices are triggers. In 2014 I learned what ASMR was and was so happy to find out that there are more people just like me. Feeling Blessed and Tingly

    Warm Regards,

    Keely Kapsoff

    Like

  37. I have noticed this since I was very young when someone would read to me. I am now 31 and it hit me today, that is when I decided to look into it. I was actually on the phone with an individual who was deep in thought while looking into something. The subtle thoughts under the breath triggered it. Before that the last time I could think of was when someone was taking the time to explain the details of a camera and how to take different pictures.

    Art class lectures also triggered me a few times. I could probably go on some more… either way I am rather interested in why this happens.

    Like

    • I also forgot about eye exams. Every time the doctor looks deep in my eye during the exam it would trigger. I think this might still be triggered by the deep thought the doctor was in…

      Like

  38. Well, if even horses like “whispering”, why should human beeings not? I think we like it so well, because today we all need (more) attention and tenderness in life, and still we all “know” this unconditional behavior as we were little babies from our mothers, it’s placed ineradicable in our earliest memories.

    Like

  39. Encouraged to see this community growing. I’ve had ASMR sensations since I was young, mostly triggered by important moments in life, or the hight of a story in a movie when accompanied by music. I notice the trend of people looking for ASMR “triggers” but I also experience the ability to conjure the sensations even when I’m alone, in the quiet, meditating or thinking about stories of how people survive hardships. For me, the concept of human survival is what often moves my ASMR sensations. I think this is some exciting stuff!

    Like

  40. I have been experiencing this my entire life, I’m 27 now. I have told friends about it and they did not understand what I was talking about. Currently I know 2 people in real life that cause the sensation. I only have it when people are talking, nothing else causes it. One of them speaks Dutch, the other English and French. There is also a youtube video that causes it, that guy speaks French: http://youtu.be/M0qanlnnN-c?t=4m19s This is unintentional, I have not found a single ASMR video on youtube that works for me though… No one can explain this to me. I’m not worried, but I do find it weird.

    Like

  41. Regarding the age skewed results, a large portion of your ASMR-experiencer respondents may send the survey to older relatives if needed. I know I would in the name of research.

    Like

  42. I heard a story on NPR recently about this and was astounded. I’ve experienced this as long as I can remember. It is triggered mainly by people doing things for me. For decades I never mentioned this to anyone. It just seemed too unusual, and I figured that if I weren’t alone, someone would have mentioned it before.

    I had a powerful experience today after a physical therapy session that involved following simple instructions to do some stretches and exercises.

    I think my wife thinks it’s a little wacko. I told her about it after the NPR report.

    Like

  43. Delighted to find this website as I had wondered for 60 years how widespread the tingles were. The skewed age range of your respondents probably just reflects smaller internet use in the older population.

    Like

    • I agree with Mary Quite Contrary. I am 61 and have experienced this ever since I can remember. I remember I would lay in bed as a small child about 5 years old and the sound of the nearby train would start to trigger the tingle and I would fall asleep. All through my life I had this feeling. I can make it come whenever I want. Sitting at my computer at work I can start the trigger myself and take a break. It is so wonderful. I have also been able to concentrate the tingles on a painful area in my body and it would make the pain go away. I would like to know more about this. For a long time I thought it could be something spiritual and I still do think it might be along with the biological aspect. I have taken a class in healing touch and it really works with that on other people. I think it would be great to be able to transfer this feeling onto others. More research should be done.

      Like

  44. Pingback: ASMR data from website polls | ASMR University

  45. I have experienced ASMR since I was very young (can not recall an exact age). It is always feels like a pleasurable wave of tingles starting from the back of my head and ending at the tip of my spine. I have never had it triggered from any noises or videos. It most often occurs when somebody else is making or doing something, usually if it what they are doing is for me. The most intense example I can recall was at a P.F. Chang’s restaurant when a waiter prepared a dish of Mu Shu Pork at my table. The most recent experience of ASMR was about an hour ago of the time I am writing then, when a friend came to my house and handed me a paper I had asked him to write for me. I hope to learn more about ASMR and I thank you for the work you are doing.

    Like

    • I remember two specific instances…one in which someone who was going to buy our house called me and asked me gently to do various measurements of specific places in the house. The other when a co-cub scout leader called me to tell me what she had planned for a cub scout event; she spoke specifically and with great detail, wanting to get my agreement…again, she spoke softly, wanting my approval.
      ,

      Like

    • This is the sort of thing that triggers it in my wife and I. We have a retail store and someone looking mindlessly through folded clothes does it for both of us. Someone sweeping also works well. I grew up with this (I’m 61) and never knew anyone else that experienced it until I met my wife. It isn’t why we married but maybe it’s a key to our compatibility.

      Sound doesn’t do it for either of us.

      Like

  46. I can remember from a young age that I loved the sound of chalk on a chalkboard but do not specifically recall ASMR associated with it. I have always (and still do) respond strongly to certain colors of sparkles. There are certain mouth sounds that at times have the opposite effect of ASMR, LOL! Sometimes ASMR occurs with no specific trigger but I find that if I relax my jaw position, the ASMR disappears. Thank you for the work you are doing!

    Like

  47. Until aged 11 chalkboard clicking sounds would infrequently cause extreme weakness in right hand making it difficult to write for several minutes. I could stop this effect by concentrating after the fact. This seemed to go away on its own.

    Like

Comment On This Topic (pseudonym OK; email optional)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s