Peer-reviewed research publications about Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR)

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityHow many peer-reviewed research publications about ASMR currently exist?  The answer is three.

I’ve created this post as a quick resource for anyone looking to learn more about these publications.

Below are the details for each publication, along with links to each publication, summaries of the data, interviews with the authors, and podcast episodes about each publication.

Continue reading

Science of ASMR: The first peer-reviewed research publication (podcast episode #10)

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityIn this podcast episode, I will be summarizing the data from the first peer-reviewed research publication about ASMR.

The paper is titled, “Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state”, is authored by Emma Barratt and Nick Davis, and was published March 26, 2015.

You will hear about the data from the paper related to these questions:

  • Why do people watch ASMR videos?
  • What are common ASMR triggers?
  • When do people first experience ASMR?
  • Do ASMR videos help people to feel less depressed?
  • Do ASMR videos lessen the symptoms of chronic pain?
  • And more.

Subscribe to the ASMR University Podcast to hear all of the past and future episodes or listen to this one episode right here:

Continue reading

Researchers use fMRI to publish first biological study about ASMR-sensitive individuals

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityIn 2015, Emma Barratt and Nick Davis published the first peer-reviewed research study about ASMR.  Their data were collected from online surveys and were very helpful to provide support about the sensations and potential applications of ASMR.

Now,  Stephen Smith, Beverley Fredborg, and Jennifer Kornelsen from the University of Winnipeg in Manitoba, Canada have published the second peer-reviewed research study about ASMR.

A key difference between these two publication is that the more recent publication by Smith et al is the first biological publication about ASMR.

Continue reading

What would a body map of ASMR sensations look like?

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityEmma Barrett and Nick Davis actually proposed a body map of the ASMR sensation in their 2015 research paper.

They created the image of the body map from the data gathered in their survey.  The image shows that the strongest ASMR sensations were in the head, spine, and shoulders – and got weaker with distance from the head.

Their image of the ASMR sensation is almost identical to body map images in a paper recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) journal titled, “Topography of social touching depends on emotional bonds between humans.”

Continue reading

Part 4: The first peer-reviewed publication about ASMR: Interview with the authors

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityThis is Part 4, and the conclusion, of my blog post series on the first peer-reviewed paper about ASMR.

As a refresher, the paper is titled, “Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state”. It was published on March 26th, 2015 in the journal PeerJ.

This post is an interview with the authors of the paper, Emma Barratt and Nick Davis.

Dr. Nick Davis has his PhD in Psychology from the University of Birmingham (UK) and is currently working in the Department of Psychology at Swansea University (UK) as a Lecturer in Psychology.

Ms Emma Barratt is the lead author of the paper and has her MSc in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University (Wales).

The authors share their inspirations for beginning the research, challenges with writing the paper, and Ms. Barratt finds out a shocking fact about her co-author.

Continue reading

ASMR research publication helps ASMR artist to keep his YouTube channel

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversitySensorAdi (his online identity, not his real name) is an ASMR artist on YouTube. He has been creating and posting ASMR videos on his channel “SensorAdi ASMR” since 2013.

He has posted over 150 soothing videos of himself painting, making gentle brushing sounds, softly scratching and tapping on wood, walking through leaves, and performing relaxing clinical role-plays.

It is obvious from the comments that most of his YouTube followers find his videos helpful for relaxing and falling asleep.  A comment on his most popular video from one viewer reflects the sentiments from most other viewers, “I had to listen to this right before I went to sleep and I am at complete ease and peaceful.”

He told me that one viewer even wrote to him from the hospital to let him know that his videos were helpful to him while he was getting treatment for an infection.

Knowing that his videos are helpful to others is important to SensorAdi, “It is very nice and motivating feeling to me.”

But SensorAdi is not just an ASMR artist, he is also a school teacher in Poland.

He has been teaching High School students (ages 15-19) in his current position for the past 7 years.  I asked him what makes him a good teacher and he replied, “I am honest, authentic.  I am interested in the issues and problems of students.”

Recently though, SensorAdi has had his own issues and problems.

Continue reading

Part 3: The first peer-reviewed publication about ASMR: Meaning of the data & next steps.

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityThis is Part 3 of my blog post series on the first peer-reviewed paper about ASMR.

As a refresher, the paper is titled, “Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state”.  It was authored by Emma Barratt and Nick Davis and was published on March 26th, 2015 in the journal PeerJ.

This post is going to focus on the meaning of some of the data, as well as highlight how future studies could build on the helpful foundation provided by the authors of this paper.

This post is mostly for students and researchers looking for ASMR research ideas.  Just look for the sections in this post marked “Next steps” for potential ASMR research projects you could do.

Let’s begin by reviewing and understanding the methods and the participants, this will help to keep the overall meaning of the data in an appropriate scope.

Continue reading

Part 2: The first peer-reviewed publication about ASMR: Significance of the paper

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityThis is Part 2 of my blog post series on the first peer-reviewed paper about ASMR.

As a refresher, the paper is titled, “Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state”.  It was authored by Emma Barratt and Nick Davis and was published on March 26th, 2015.

This post is going to focus on the significance of this first peer-reviewed research paper about ASMR.

Lets begin with asking: what does it mean when a paper is “peer-reviewed?”

Continue reading

Part 1: The first peer-reviewed publication about ASMR: Summary of the data

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityThe first peer-reviewed paper about ASMR has been published in the journal PeerJ.

I am highly excited about this event and very proud of the authors of this paper.

The paper is titled, “Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state” and is authored by Emma Barratt and Nick Davis. The authors are members of the Department of Psychology at Swansea University in the United Kingdom.

The publication was officially published as a peer-reviewed publication on March 26, 2015, but was initially published as a “PrePrint” on December 18, 2014.

The study was reviewed and approved by the Swansea University Department of Psychology Ethics Committee prior to the initiation of data collection.

This is such an important achievement that I will cover this event in several blog posts. This first post will simply focus on summarizing the data in the publication.

Continue reading