Interview with the YouTube ASMR artist, Holly ASMR

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityHolly is an ASMR artist who lives in London, England and creates videos for her YouTube Channel, Holly ASMR.

She starting creating videos less than a year ago but has already posted over 100 videos on her channel and is about to hit 30,000 followers.

To achieve that many followers that quickly is a testament to the quality of her videos and the genuine and consistent effort she puts into her productions.

In my interview with Holly she shares her recent inspiration for creating ASMR videos, her most popular video, her biggest challenges, valuable tips for new ASMR artists, and how her videos are helping others.

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10 Tips for new ASMR artists from Deni ASMRCz

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityDenisa “Deni” Vondruskova is an undergraduate student majoring in Psychology at Palacky University, Olomouc in the Czech Republic.

She has also been creating ASMR videos as Deni ASMRCz for the past 3 years.

I recently interviewed Deni about her YouTube channel and live ASMR sessions.  When I looked through her videos on YouTube I noticed that she had created over 135 ASMR videos.

I asked her if she would also be interested in creating a top ten list of tips for new ASMR artists as a way to share the experience and wisdom she gained from producing all those videos.

Deni agreed and provided an impressive list of helpful advice for new artists, which may also contain some helpful nuggets for established artists.

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Viewers of live ASMR videos may soon be able to feel the touch of an ASMR artist with Flex-N-Feel gloves

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian ResponseVideo ASMR artists can directly stimulate ASMR in viewers with gentle sounds, soft voices, and comforting visuals.

But they have been unable to directly stimulate the sensation of touch through a video.  And touch may be the strongest trigger of ASMR.

Could there be a way to feel the touch of someone who is in another room or even in another country?

Yes.

Researchers at Simon Fraser University in Canada have designed gloves called Flex-N-Feel to be worn by individuals at separate locations.  When one person Flexes their fingers in the gloves, the other person Feels the touch via vibrotactile sensations on their skin.

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Amazon’s Alexa can now whisper, is this the first virtual ASMR artist?

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityAlexa is a virtual assistant created by Amazon which runs on the  Amazon Echo devices.

Users interact with Alexa by voice command to initiate many actions such as; set alarms, play music, podcasts, or audiobooks, create to-do lists, and inquire about the weather, traffic, news, and other information.

Until now, Alexa’s voice has been a spoken female voice, but Amazon has just added the ability for Alexa to whisper.  Alexa will also be able to take a breath to pause for emphasis and adjust her rate, pitch and volume.

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Interview with Deni ASMRCZ, an ASMR artist offering live ASMR sessions.

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityDenisa “Deni” Vondruskova is an undergraduate student majoring in Psychology at Palacky University, Olomouc in the Czech Republic.

Deni is also an ASMR artist. She creates recorded videos for her YouTube channel Deni ASMRCZ, and she also offers live video ASMR sessions.

I was excited to be able to interview Deni because I’ve been interested in talking to more artists who are offering live ASMR sessions.

In my interview with Deni she points out the paradox of her two most popular videos, her inspiration for offering recorded and live ASMR, how her live ASMR sessions differ from her ASMR videos, the challenges of providing live ASMR sessions, and how her efforts are helping others.

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Libby Copeland visits Whisperlodge for a live ASMR experience

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityLibby Copeland lives in Westchester, NY, USA and has a BA degree in English from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, USA.

She has been a staff reporter, editor, and/or writer for The Washington Post, Slate, New York Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and Glamour, as well as, made appearances on MSNBC, CNN, and NPR.

Libby also has a strong interest in ASMR.

She recently traveled to Brooklyn, NY to experience one of the first live, in-person, professional ASMR services called Whisperlodge, and then wrote about it for New York Magazine.

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Filmmaker begins production of the ASMR-inspired movie, “P.A.I.N.”

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityMike Reed lives in Denmead, UK, has attended South Downs College, and has a Foundation Diploma in Fine Art from Portsmouth College Art & Design.

Mike also creates ASMR videos for his YouTube channel, “Show Me ASMR” and has begun production of a full feature length ASMR film titled, “P.A.I.N.”.

Mike’s movie “P.A.I.N.” now joins the movie “Murmurs” on a very short list of ASMR movies currently in production.

In my interview with Mike he shares his inspiration for creating an ASMR movie, information about other movies he has produced, why the movie is titled, “P.A.I.N.”, the types of ASMR triggers which will be incorporated into the production, and the release date of the movie.

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Meet Nick, the YouTube artist known as “theASMRnerd”

ASMR Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response UniversityNick has his B.Sc. in Biology from the University of Victoria and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of British Columbia in Canada.

Nick is also known as the ASMR artist, theASMRnerd. He has created over 130 ASMR videos since February of 2013 and currently has almost 36,000 followers.

And I must confess, “theASMRnerd” is definitely one of my favorite ASMR artist names.

In my interview with Nick he shares why he chose his artist name, the type of content in his videos, the story behind his video “Preparing Scientific Samples”, advice for new ASMR artists, and what he would say to researchers and clinicians to get them more interested in studying ASMR.

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