Polls about ASMR

Scroll down to take some polls related to your thoughts and experiences about ASMR.

After you make your selection and click “Vote”, you will see all the data from prior visitors.

If you have already voted and just want to see the data then click “View Results.”  The data from the polls are specific to the visitors to this website and may not represent the general population or other specific populations.

 

 

 

Note about the poll above when viewing results: because it is “Select All That Apply” the total votes does not equal the total voters because each voter could vote more than once.  To get an estimate of the number of voters, look at the total votes on other polls which were not “Select All That Apply.” because those total votes = total voters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note about the poll above when viewing results: because it is “Select All That Apply” the total votes does not equal the total voters because each voter could vote more than once.  To get an estimate of the number of voters, look at the total votes on other polls which were not “Select All That Apply.” because those total votes = total voters.

96 thoughts on “Polls about ASMR

  1. I’m a 25 year old female. My first memorable ASMR experience was Middle School. I would be waiting for class to start and I’d glance across the room and see girls braiding each other’s hair and I’d get intense tingles/”brain-gasm”s! The same thing happened at slumber parties. Hair-play has always been my #1 trigger. Now days I watch asmrmassage on You Tube and her videos help a lot with my Insomnia and Migraines. I came out about my ASMR to my husband a few months ago (I didn’t even know ASMR was a movement, he caught me listening to a soft spoken video one night and was totally confused). At first he said he could relate because he gets shivers through his body, like the online definition states. But like a previous commenter stated, “Chills” and “ASMR” are quite different. I get Chills a lot, but when I get ASMR I know it’s entirely different. After I explained to my husband that it literally feels like my brain is having an orgasm he said he definitely doesn’t have it – haha!

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  2. My first experience of ASMR was at the age of 18, when my mom was filing and buffing her nails beside me. Suddenly and for no reason it made me extremely relaxed, and I just sat on the sofa staring at one spot, apparently unable to move a finger!
    I thought (as well as my mom!) that I was a freak, as the ASMR phenomenon was completely unknown back then.
    Since then, the list of my triggers has grown considerably.
    However, my friends and relatives continue to regard me as a freak :))

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  3. Pingback: ASMR data from website polls (August 2015 update) | ASMR University

  4. I experience ASMR when ever I hear something soft like a whisper or tapping, I remember first experiencing it in the 2,3,or 4 grade, when ever some one would touch me lightly,And I have had it ever since.

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  5. This is day 2 since I have become familiar with the term ASMR. I started to read into it and do some quick online research (aka Google) to learn more about it after finding myself on enjoying youtube videos these last 2 nights. I was curious why I found these type of videos so relaxing. For the last two nights its helped me go to sleep. However, I have always found myself extremely relaxed when someone is doing quiet things around me. I also laughed when I read on a link that a common trigger for those who experience ASMR is the “happy trees” painter from PBS. I literally laughed out loud because I often found myself watching his shows and not being able to change the channel. I secretly enjoyed it but I didn’t know why! I realized tonight that the earliest memory I have of this ASMR experience was when I was in 3rd or 4th grade when a girl I was sitting next to in school was eating hard candy during reading time. You’re not supposed to have candy in class so she was eating it as quiet as she could. I still remember this vividly because it relaxed me so much I secretly hoped she wouldn’t ever run out of candy. Something about the sound of her crunching and the crinkling of the wrappers. So weird but now I am finding I’m not alone and there are thousands if not millions out there experiencing this. I feel like I finally have a diagnosis and a name to something I’ve experienced my whole life. I’m thrilled to see research on this subject to say the least and am curious to see what comes of it in the future as more research is done.

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