Polls about ASMR

Scroll down to take some polls related to your thoughts and experiences about ASMR.

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Note about the poll above when viewing results: because it is “Select All That Apply” the total votes does not equal the total voters because each voter could vote more than once.  To get an estimate of the number of voters, look at the total votes on other polls which were not “Select All That Apply.” because those total votes = total voters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note about the poll above when viewing results: because it is “Select All That Apply” the total votes does not equal the total voters because each voter could vote more than once.  To get an estimate of the number of voters, look at the total votes on other polls which were not “Select All That Apply.” because those total votes = total voters.

96 thoughts on “Polls about ASMR

  1. I find it interesting that the “brain tingle” seems to most readily discussed as a reaction to sound. I don’t recall ever having that sensation from sound, I get it from touch. It is not something I feel on my skin – there is a sound that makes my skin “crawl” that is not pleasant. For me I have a euphoric “brain tingle” from touch – specifically, it occurs consistently when I get a spa pedicure. Even more specifically, it occurs when having a salt scrub on my legs. It does not feel like a sexual experience, so it is not touch in that way. And I don’t feel a tingle on my legs – it is “in my head.” Thinking about it immediately to an hour or two afterwards sometimes triggers the response again in the head area or as a shooting tingle – but this is rare. It isn’t a sensation that I would describe as on my skin but in my body. I would LOVE to see read more cognitive studies on the subject.

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  2. Since a young age, I’ve always felt a tingling sensation when my hair was being touched. I particularly (And still do!) loved haircuts, my mother and siblings grooming and styling my hair for me, and my older sister or mom occasionally giving me scalp massages. Throughout the years, I’ve gained more triggers such as personal attention, ‘presenting’ (Where someone shows you an item), hand grooming, people in good moods, and many more. I never knew the name of it until about two years ago, when I was watching VSauce, and then researched as to why I experienced this particular sensation, and my suspicions were correct–I experience asmr! Ever since, I’ve been watching asmr videos like I read books, and I’ve found myself addicted to the relaxing sensation. Mine in particular feels like a rushing, chilly wave blanketing over my head, and sometimes reaching to my arms.

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  3. My first experience with ‘the whisperchills’ was at school, aged 13. My PE teacher took another class for us, religious education. I am a strong believer ALL religion should be abolished. She accepted my opinion, respected it and continued a mature conversation with us all. She spoke softly, with understanding. To her, we weren’t just kids. We were young adults.

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  4. I am curious to know how many people who experience asmr also like to play video games, watch movies and tv shows or read books. Because i think there is a correlation between asmr and the need to “escape” into fantasy worlds created by video games or movies, tv shows and books.

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    • That is a great question and unfortunately my current research survey does not gather direct data about that, and I don’t know of anyone else collecting data about that. But it is a good research curiosity. I agree with you that there may be a correlation bc I am seeing a trend in my data that some people just watch ASMR videos for enjoyment. Anything enjoyable can be a similar escape like movies, tv, or books. I would encourage you or anyone else to pursue this great question.

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    • I definitely enjoy reading and television, but I’d imagine you’d have a difficult time finding a person who didn’t enjoy at least one of the activities you mention. I’m not sure it is related to ASMR so much as being human.

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    • This is a really interesting thought and I can agree with Rhiowen’s comment that you would “have a difficult time finding a person who didn’t enjoy the activities you mentioned” but I’ll weigh in here, for the sake of research. I’m one of those difficult-to-find people. I don’t play and have never played video games or owned a videogame console, can rarely watch an entire movie or TV show, and can almost never make it through an entire book. I experience ASMR multiple times per week and have experienced it since childhood. I’m 25 now.
      If a fantasy can grab me, I am 100% committed to it and will escape into it mercilessly. However, I am inclined to pursue concrete details, facts, and realms of non-fiction 99% of the time.

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    • I enjoy “escaping” with books but ASMR is completely different. It is a purely physical feeling. I’ve had it since childhood (when i also enjoyed escaping in books). I don’t enjoy fantasty genre movies or books or TV.

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  5. My strongest ASMR experience happens when I hear people talking softly in a foriegn language. In college I would plan to spend my lunch hour in a particular area of the library with foriegn language students. Sounds creepy, but I would be so relaxed I would often take a nap! Another time I was watching a PBS documentary about Amish women and their quilt making. The camera was positioned under a large loom, and the sound of the needles threading through the material did me in. I was thrilled to read an article in the Denver Post today about a local YouTube ASMR artist. Very excited to learn more about this wonderful phenomena.

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